Search for online dating

Somebody with malicious intent may use this to their advantage when trying to correlate your dating profile to other web content.

He or she will very likely check search engine caches for old pictures or bios that are easier to identify or contain embarrassing details.

You realized a few days later that it was too much of a privacy give-away, and made the wise choice to switch to a new photo. Search engines and archive sites are continually indexing as much content as they can from the internet.

These sites retain cached copies of images and pages long after they are changed or erased at the original source.

This isn’t necessarily traditional hash or metadata specific – cropping or resizing an image is not a foolproof way to defeat this (as I show in the screenshot below, where Tineye and Google correctly identified my profile selfie which is substantially cropped on social media).

Give some consideration to how much information you’re giving other users over time and as a whole.

Did you post that you live in Milwaukee, tell a user that you live in an apartment with a pool, and tell another that you live next to an airport?

If you post data which compromises your privacy or reputation to your profile, remove it and consider starting fresh with an entirely new profile.

If needed, pursue sites and search engines to remove what they can and will, and disassociate your online identity as much as possible from the content. The individual facts and conversations you post on dating sites might not give away your identity, but as a collective whole, they may.

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